Morning Paper 12-27-16

THE RYOKAN IN TOYKO

While Japan’s earliest ryokans were conceived around the 17th century, during the Edo period, and frequently appeared along popular routes that linked Edo (present day Tokyo) to other parts of the country, today’s ryokans – just like western hotels – range in their level of luxuriousness. But even the most plush properties are still rooted in history, and capture austere simplicity, while conveying the idea of omotenashi.

Read more on http://www.elledecor.com/life-culture/travel/a9448/ryokan-tokyo/

THE FUTURE IS ICE ARCHITECTURE

Though there are four standard types of reinforced ice construction, researchers from hydraulic engineering research company B. E. Vedeneev VNIIG, in St. Petersburg, Russia, and the Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands, identify the igloo as the first and best known of these. Made from blocks of wind-blown snow for its insulating capabilities, this one-room building typology exhibits a catenoid section—constructed with an ideal size ratio between diameter and height— to mitigate structural tension as the material gradually compresses over time. The scientists recognize that the Inuit often employed lichen to strengthen igloo structures as well as to minimize creep.

Read more on http://www.architectmagazine.com/technology/a-promising-future-for-ice-architecture_o

TEXTILE LEGACY

From as far back as I can remember I’ve had looms in my life. From I was 7 years old, we lived in a small house attached to the workshop so after school the workshop would become my playground. There is nowhere I feel more at home than in the workshop surrounded by our looms, piles of yarn and the smell of the lanolin in the wool. Our house was and still is full of my grandmother’s and my mother’s textile designs – rugs, blankets, cushions, furnishing fabrics, curtains.

Read more at http://www.decor-living.com/interviews.html

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